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A Look Back At The 2019 Beekeeping Season

December 31, 2019 2 Comments

A Look Back At The 2019 Beekeeping Season

The 2019 beekeeping season was a rough one for many Alberta beekeepers.

It was a cold, wet and tough honey seasonThe weather was extremely cold for overwintering hives during the 2018 to 2019 winter months, which was hard on the bees. Then once spring came, it brought more cool and wet weather that gave the bees very few good flying days and limited the blooms they had access to.

In the summer months, we also experienced a long lull between the dandelion flow and the beginning of the main flow with alfalfa and canola. Those were a tough few weeks for the bees as the hives were built up to their maximum population with little nectar sources in site.

Eventually the main flow did arrived, but not until mid-July for most. When it came, it was quick! And, honey production in Alberta was down 40-50% in the 2019 beekeeping season. This was one of the toughest seasons to manage a hive.

August also brought many calls about swarms, which was very unusual for that time of year. 

In September, registered beekeepers received notice from the Alberta Apicultrist that varroa mites counts were very high in the fall, and they offered recommendations on treatements.

We wrapped up our hives as usual for the winter with the hopes they thrive in the spring. Many had some weak hives and strong hives, but only time will tell how they do. Every year brings a different experience for beekeepers, and no two years are the same. As beekeepers, we are always learning something new. Take a look back at our 2019 season here.

We appreciate your business online and in our Edmonton store, and we look forward to supporting you in 2020. Thank you for following us on social media and joining us at Meet The Beekeeper! 

Drop by our Edmonton store when you are planning your 2020 season, and if you haven’t ordered your 2020 Bees yet, order now. Our Meet the Beekeeper Field Days will resume in April 2020.

Happy New Year!
From Your Hiveworld Team




2 Responses

Robert Wilkinson
Robert Wilkinson

February 06, 2020

Overwintered 1 hive, I had 3 of swarms in June, and caught them all, the last one I just put back in the hive, 75% no flying days. Had a swarm in August and when I went to figure out what to do with my hives for winter, I looked at the possibility of survival, and have two strong hive and made a weak hive out of two really weak hives. But the part I wanted to mention was how I had no remorse and was basically uncaring when I took out my tiger torch and roasted off 7 frames bees to combine the frames with another hive but not over populate them and risk depleting their winter supply. I hope they learnt their lesson that this beek rules with an Iron fist.

Albert Aris
Albert Aris

January 15, 2020

I ended up with 2 strong hives and one August recovered swarm. I treated all for varroa in December. Hopefully all 3 succeed in wintering over. Happy New year to all and the best of Bee keeping in 2020.

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